Friday, March 21, 2008

Fancy Fingerwork

Alex is a little heavier than most babies of his age (no surprise, I suppose). As a result, the simple full-body skills mastered by like-aged babies are more difficult for Alex. Rolling over, for example, is most easily achieved in the comfort of the bathtub, where Alex benefits from buoyancy and the reduced friction of soapy skin on slippery tub enamel. Sitting up is possible but generates complaints. About 10 minutes into a sitting session, Alex throws up his hands in defeat and, with great force, lunges backward so that he can return to his favorite lounging position. And Alex shows about as much interest in crawling as a fish does--he prefers to swim across the floor.

The pediatrician assures me that Alex is perfectly normal--as long as he can roll over and sit up, which he technically can, it doesn't matter whether he likes to do it or not. Luckily, I've been preoccupied with my own hypochondria (on Wednesday, I thought I might be leaking spinal fluid (!) out my nose; Kendall assures me I just have a cold), so I haven't begun the Google searches on childhood developmental issues--yet.

But Alex is not just a blob in life. With little else to do while he lies on the floor, Alex has fine-tuned his hand-eye coordination and has achieved amazing control over his hands and fingers--he could deal cards in Vegas. His finger dexterity is applicable to many advanced skills:


So maybe your seven-and-a-half-month-old baby is rolling around your house, bull-dozing everything in his path, pulling himself up to standing positions and slobbering all over your Italian leather sofa, etc. Big deal. Ours is working on Rachmaninoff and PHP programming.

9 comments:

  1. Well--I LOVE Alex, and I haven't even met him. He is a genius too, no doubt about it.

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  2. He is adorable, and he doesn't seem behind to me. My boys didn't want to crawl forever. They wanted to stand but crawling came much later. He is going to be a genius!

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  3. It doesn't surprise me one bit that he so apt with his musical and computer skills with parents like you. I'm sure he'll crawl, sit, and even walk when he is darn good and ready to and not a minute sooner! He's adorable!!

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  4. He is so darn cute! I love his big cheeks!

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  5. To whom it may concern:
    If you are reading this on the Wii internet channel, nobody is swearing. They are saying D-A-R-N. And to those who are very confused at this moment... its an inside joke.

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  6. carolina: csf from your nose? it would be fun to be your primary care doc...

    our boy michael was similar in the way he treated locomotion. he didn't choose to walk till close to 14 months...i did have the development chart up on the wall and watch the verbal and dexterity skills excel to assuage my concerns for his lack of desire to walk. i read somewhere that the verbal and fine motor skills are more predictive of future intelligence anyway...

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  7. Paul: it's possible, isn't it? The leak has stopped, though, so my brain and spinal cord are going to be okay (sigh of relief). Otherwise, I'd send you a sample.

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  8. I love that you have these medical / alien abduction fears! I wish I had known this about you earlier; it is so funny and quirky! I am the same way when it comes to my kids. Brig, on the other hand, is simply not allowed to become ill. Then I will call him a whiner (he isn't at all).

    I love Alex's abundant hair. Babies with hair are so adorable. And even without the evidence of his computer programming skills and musical talent, there was never any doubt about his superior intellect!

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  9. carolina: anything is possible...i'll give you that.

    usually, CSF leakage from the nose comes from high speed trauma. i have certainly seen this happen. however, it is almost invariably accompanied by facial/skull fractures. you would be able to tell if your skull has been fractured in several ways, pain, bruising (racoon eyes, battle sign below the ears), inability to move your eyes in certain directions, facial bone instability etc. in addition, there is usually some inciting event...(ie. you fell of the roof of the reed smoot library)in the absense of these classsic signs and symptoms, you're probably safe.

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